It Shouldn’t Happen to a Pig

Angry farmers attack BBC programme

Financial Times

Farmers and butchers are preparing to bombard the switchboards of BBC local and regional radio stations after next Tuesday’s Brass Tacks programme on BBC2 about modern practices in livestock farming and meat production. If the protesters have their way the TV panel scheduled to discuss the programme will be heavily loaded with industry spokesmen. The National Farmers’ Union,is preparing what a spokesman calls “hot missiles” to be sent speeding to the BBC’s director-general, the chairman of the corporation’s board of governors and Mr Geoffrey Cannon, editor of Radio Times.

Sunday roast drug threat

Daily Mail
ENTERTAINMENT EXTRA
by Patrick O’Neill

A BLACK market operation providing drugs for factory farms could be a danger to health. This is just one of the claims to be made in a controversial TV documentary next week. It traces links between the use of antibiotics in farm animals and the increase in food poisoning among humans. The first is a new series of the BBC’s Brass Tacks programme investigates the increase in factory farming in Britain and links it with major public health dangers in the future. The programme deals with controls over Britain’s animal drug industry

Protest at drugs ‘scare’

Sunday Telegraph
By DAVID BROWN
Agricultural Correspondent

The National Farmers’ Union is preparing to send a strongly-worded letter of protest to Mr Ian Threthowan, director general of the BBC, about a forthcoming television programme which will claim that people may be harmed by eating meat from cattle, pigs and poultry which have been treated by veterinary drugs. The union, which represents 140,000 farmers in England and Wales, together with the British Veterinary Association and the National Federation of Meat Traders, are angry that they were not consulted about the contents of the programme