Public Access TV

People have always talked to television; it is just that television has not always listened – The Guardian

The Guardian
Nancy Banks-Smith

GILBERT HARDING was not only the first TV man, he was the first two-way TV man. A friend remembers him “watching and arguing with the television.” He would carry on these one-way discussions with whomever it was he happened to be watching and get quite violent about it. I remember him having a set-to like that with Cliff Michelmore and then, when the programme was finished, he phoned up Michelmore and continued the argument in person. People have always talked to television; it is just that television has not always listened. It Shouldn’t Happen to a Pig, the first Brass Tacks programme, was not so much an eye-opener as a stomach turner

It Shouldn’t Happen To a Pig, Brass Tacks, BBC2 (1979)

8.10-9.0 New Series
Brass Tacks
It Shouldn’t Happen To a Pig

Diseases spread quickly in factory farms unless antibiotics are used to keep them at bay. And those diseases increasingly develop antibiotic resistance that can spill over into the human population. So is it time to call a halt? Is it time to chose between cheap meat and safe meat?

Peril of pig in a poke

Daily Mirror

AT last, democracy is coming to television. Tonight, you, the viewers, can pick up your phone or put pen to paper and have a chance to air your opinions. The revolutionary experiment is the brainchild of the Manchester-based “Brass Tacks” team. After tonight’s programme in the new “Brass Tacks” series called “It Shouldn’t Happen to a Pig” (BBC-2, 8.10 p.m.) viewers will be invited to give their views, either by phoning any local BBC radio station or by writing to the producers


Liverpool Echo

FACTORY farming may mean cheap food but are we paying too high a price for this benefit in terms of health? That’s the alarming question tackled by It Shouldn’t Happen to a Pig (BBC-2, 8.10) which launches a new series of Brass Tacks debates. With poultry, pigs and beef being reared in increasingly crowded conditions that foster large-scale disease, the use of antibiotics is spreading. And with many modern diseases becoming resistant to treatment, the bacteria that cause salmonella, typhoid and meningitis are able to affect the human consumer

TV Preview: It Shouldn’t Happen to a Pig

The Guardian
TV Preview

Brass Tacks (BBC-2, 8.10) returns with a full-blooded commitment to the multi-media technique it has pioneered: a report and debate thrashing through a topic of current controversy in the television programme, with BBC local radio stations lined up to start phone-in discussion the moment the television has ended. Factory farming, and the public risk of food poisoning arising from its crowded conditions and use of drugs – with salmonella the main enemy – is the first subject

A Calculated Risk, Brass Tacks, BBC2 (1978)

Brass Tacks
A Calculated Risk

If the predictions of the nuclear industry are correct we can look forward to limitless cheap energy, economic growth and an increasingly powerful role in world affairs. If the predictions of the opponents of nuclear power are correct, there is serious cause for concern. The dangers of the creation of plutonium in large quantities in conditions of increasing world unrest are genuine and serious