Television

CHEAP FOOD, BUT AT WHAT COST?

Liverpool Echo

FACTORY farming may mean cheap food but are we paying too high a price for this benefit in terms of health? That’s the alarming question tackled by It Shouldn’t Happen to a Pig (BBC-2, 8.10) which launches a new series of Brass Tacks debates. With poultry, pigs and beef being reared in increasingly crowded conditions that foster large-scale disease, the use of antibiotics is spreading. And with many modern diseases becoming resistant to treatment, the bacteria that cause salmonella, typhoid and meningitis are able to affect the human consumer

TV probe into farming drugs use

Manchester Evening News

The extensive use of drugs on British farms could pose a serious threat to public health through a build up of salmonella infection, according to a TV programme this week. This and other findings linked to the alleged “indiscriminate” use of drugs in livestock farming were powerfully spelled out in a BBC documentary – a programme shrouded in controversy even before its transmission. The fist in BBC-2’s new series “Brass Tacks,” it set out to investigate the connections between a rapid build up over the last few years of salmonella virus in meat and the use of certain antibiotics

TV Preview: It Shouldn’t Happen to a Pig

The Guardian
TV Preview

Brass Tacks (BBC-2, 8.10) returns with a full-blooded commitment to the multi-media technique it has pioneered: a report and debate thrashing through a topic of current controversy in the television programme, with BBC local radio stations lined up to start phone-in discussion the moment the television has ended. Factory farming, and the public risk of food poisoning arising from its crowded conditions and use of drugs – with salmonella the main enemy – is the first subject

Drugs-in-farming programme starts BBC-TV row

Farmers Guardian

A major row flared this week between leaders of the livestock and meat industries and the BBC. The cause is a Radio Times front cover colour picture of a pig drawing attention to a BBC2 television programme on the use of growth promoting drugs in farming. The programme, to be screened next Tuesday, is the first in a new series of discussion programmes entitled “Brass Tacks“. It will deal with the use and misuse of drugs in farming

Angry farmers attack BBC programme

Financial Times

Farmers and butchers are preparing to bombard the switchboards of BBC local and regional radio stations after next Tuesday’s Brass Tacks programme on BBC2 about modern practices in livestock farming and meat production. If the protesters have their way the TV panel scheduled to discuss the programme will be heavily loaded with industry spokesmen. The National Farmers’ Union,is preparing what a spokesman calls “hot missiles” to be sent speeding to the BBC’s director-general, the chairman of the corporation’s board of governors and Mr Geoffrey Cannon, editor of Radio Times.

Sunday roast drug threat

Daily Mail
ENTERTAINMENT EXTRA
by Patrick O’Neill

A BLACK market operation providing drugs for factory farms could be a danger to health. This is just one of the claims to be made in a controversial TV documentary next week. It traces links between the use of antibiotics in farm animals and the increase in food poisoning among humans. The first is a new series of the BBC’s Brass Tacks programme investigates the increase in factory farming in Britain and links it with major public health dangers in the future. The programme deals with controls over Britain’s animal drug industry

Protest at drugs ‘scare’

Sunday Telegraph
By DAVID BROWN
Agricultural Correspondent

The National Farmers’ Union is preparing to send a strongly-worded letter of protest to Mr Ian Threthowan, director general of the BBC, about a forthcoming television programme which will claim that people may be harmed by eating meat from cattle, pigs and poultry which have been treated by veterinary drugs. The union, which represents 140,000 farmers in England and Wales, together with the British Veterinary Association and the National Federation of Meat Traders, are angry that they were not consulted about the contents of the programme

A Calculated Risk, Brass Tacks, BBC2 (1978)

BBC2
8.10-9.0
Brass Tacks
A Calculated Risk

If the predictions of the nuclear industry are correct we can look forward to limitless cheap energy, economic growth and an increasingly powerful role in world affairs. If the predictions of the opponents of nuclear power are correct, there is serious cause for concern. The dangers of the creation of plutonium in large quantities in conditions of increasing world unrest are genuine and serious