Tag Archives: Science & Technology

People have always talked to television; it is just that television has not always listened

TELEVISION
Nancy Banks-Smith
The Guardian, 9 May 1979

GILBERT HARDING was not only the first TV man, he was the first two-way TV man. A friend remembers him “watching and arguing with the television.” He would carry on these one-way discussions with whomever it was he happened to be watching and get quite violent about it.

I remember him having a set-to like that with Cliff Michelmore and then, when the programme was finished, he phoned up Michelmore and continued the argument in person. People have always talked to television; it is just that television has not always listened.

Following Peter Fiddick’s programme on Two Way Television, Brass Tacks (BBC-2) was something like three-sided television. Brass Tacks is transmitted live. Then all the BBC’s local radio stations run phone-ins – most the same night, some less enthusiastically the next morning. Finally on Monday, Return Call will report the audience reaction in a 10-minute programme just before midnight. To me that suggests a disappointing dwindle with the Brass Tacks bellow tailing away to a whisper.

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It Shouldn’t Happen To a Pig, Brass Tacks, BBC2 (1979)

BBC2
8.10-9.0 New Series
Brass Tacks
It Shouldn’t Happen To a Pig
Radio Times, 8 May 1979

Judge for yourself – as the people who make decisions come face-to-face with the people those decisions will affect. First the arguments, then your chance to join the debate.

Britain’s public health enemy number one is salmonella. It’s a source of disease that lurks in most of the meat that we eat, and it’s on the increase because of the way our farming industry is run.

Diseases spread quickly amongst pigs and chickens in factory farms unless huge quantities of drugs are used to keep them at bay. And those diseases increasingly spill over into the human population. So is it time to call a halt? Is it time to chose between cheap meat and safe meat?

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Peril of pig in a poke

By KENNETH HUGHES
Daily Mirror, 8 May 1979

AT last, democracy is coming to television. Tonight, you, the viewers, can pick up your phone or put pen to paper and have a chance to air your opinions.

The revolutionary experiment is the brainchild of the Manchester-based “Brass Tacks” team.

After tonight’s programme in the new “Brass Tacks” series called “It Shouldn’t Happen to a Pig” (BBC-2, 8.10 pm.) viewers will be invited to give their views, either by phoning any local BBC radio station or by writing to the producers.

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DANGER ON THE DINNER TABLE

It Shouldn’t Happen to a Pig, BBC 2
Daily Star, 8 May 1979

IS THE meat you had for lunch poisoned? That is the question posed in the first programme of a new series of Brass Tacks. (BBC2. 8.10)

The programme’s ideas man, co-producer and presenter, Eric Robson, believes it is not as far fetched as it sounds.

He says: “Almost all the meat you buy from the butcher now has Salmonella on it, which causes food poisoning and could be fatal.”

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Furious farmers ready for drugs phone-in

By Richard Norton-Taylor
The Guardian, 8 May 1979

Farmers and butchers are furious over the colour photography of a piglet, on the cover of the current Radio Times, with the caption “meat and poultry may seriously affect your health.

The photograph advertises the BBC-2 programme Brass Tacks, tonight devoted to the increasing use of drugs in agriculture, particularly on factory farms, and the increasing incidence of salmonella food poisoning in Britain.

The National Farmers’ Union, which considered taking out an injunction against the Radio Times and promised to send “hot missiles” to the BBC’s chairman and director-general, is now urging farmers to bombard local and regional radio stations during the phone in debate that will follow the programme.

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Angry reply by farmers to pig programme

Leicester Mercury, 8 May 1979

LEICESTERSHIRE, Northamptonshire and Rutland farmers plan to take part in a nationwide phone-in which is being staged as a follow up to a BBC-2 television programme on Tuesday, It Shouldn’t Happen to a Pig.

They are angry about what they see as an attack on modern intensive farming methods forced on them by the public’s demand for cheap food.

They are particularly angry about the front cover of the current Radio Times with its picture of a pig and caption, Health Warning: Meat and Poultry may seriously affect your health.

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CHEAP FOOD, BUT AT WHAT COST?

Liverpool Echo, 8 May 1979

FACTORY farming may mean cheap food but are we paying too high a price for this benefit in terms of health?

That’s the alarming question tackled by It Shouldn’t Happen to a Pig (BBC-2, 8.10) which launches a new series of Brass Tacks debates.

With poultry, pigs and beef being reared in increasingly crowded conditions that foster large-scale disease, the use of antibiotics is spreading.

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TV probe into farming drugs use

Manchester Evening News, 7 May 1979

The extensive use of drugs on British farms could pose a serious threat to public health through a build up of salmonella infection, according to a TV programme this week.

This and other findings linked to the alleged “indiscriminate” use of drugs in livestock farming were powerfully spelled out in a BBC documentary – a programme shrouded in controversy even before its transmission.

The fist in BBC-2’s new series “Brass Tacks,” it set out to investigate the connections between a rapid build up over the last few years of salmonella virus in meat and the use of certain antibiotics.

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BEEF OVER BEEB’S PIG

By CLIVE CRICKMER
Daily Mirror, 7 May 1979

A picture of a pig has got Britain’s farmers snorting with fury.

It appears on the cover of the Radio Times‘ current issue with the caption: “Health warning: Meat and poultry may seriously affect your health.”

The cover highlights tomorrow evening’s BBC-2 programme “Brass Tacks” which takes a critical look at meat production. And it was slammed as alarmist yesterday by the Meat and Livestock Commission.

Chairman Wally Johnstone has sent a protest letter expressing “anger and concern” to the BBC Director General Ian Threthowan.

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Fury at Radio Times Pig

FARM MAIL
BY JOHN WINTER
Daily Mail, 7 May 1979

A COMBINED TV and radio programme on the use of drugs on farm animals has upset farmers and butchers even before it goes out.

They are furious over the front cover of this week’s Radio Times which has a picture of a pig and the caption: ‘Health warning: Meat and poultry may seriously affect your health.’

They are to make sure that their views are aired during a phone-in on 20 local radio stations which will follow the first programme on the subject on BBC 2’s Brass Tacks tomorrow night.

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